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CRBI planning pair of local paddle events

Article Published in Rome News Tribune 09/09/2011

Paddlers navigate through a Native American Fish Weir near Two Run Creek in Bartow County. These rock dams date back 500 to 1,000 years and were built to capture fish. (Contributed photo)
Paddlers navigate through a Native American Fish Weir near Two Run Creek in Bartow County. These rock dams date back 500 to 1,000 years and were built to capture fish. (Contributed photo)
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The Coosa River Basin Initiative will celebrate the impending arrival of fall with two paddle trips — a 17-mile paddle down the Etowah River on Saturday to view the best of the river’s Native American fish weirs and a 6-mile nighttime paddle on the Coosa by the light of the harvest moon on Monday.

Both trips are free to CRBI members. Canoe and kayak rentals are available. Pre-registration is required at www.coosa.org/events/paddle-trips.

Non-members can join CRBI at the discounted rate of $30 per family and reserve rental boats at the registration site. For more information call CRBI volunteer paddle trip coordinator Alan Crawford at 706-346-3509 or via e-mail at ibwheelin2@yahoo.com or call 706-232-2724.

The Fish Weir Paddle on Saturday runs 17 miles from U.S. 411 near Kingston to Grizzard Park at the Rome Bypass and begins at 9 a.m. During the trip, paddlers will explore the most remote section of the Lower Etowah and visit several Native American fish weirs.

These V-shaped rock structures were built by the region’s original inhabitants and were used to catch fish. The weirs are believed to be 500 to 1,000 years old.

The Harvest Moon Paddle on Monday runs six miles from downtown Rome to Lock & Dam Park beginning at 8 p.m. The trip will launch from Heritage Park as the moon rises over downtown and continue down the Coosa, past Black’s Bluff.

The harvest moon is the name given to the full moon closest to the first day of fall.

Paddlers should bring two light sources (flashlights or headlamps) for safety purposes.

“Being out on the river at twilight and at night is a special experience,” said Joe Cook, executive director and Riverkeeper at CRBI.

“It’s when the light is the best and when many of the nocturnal critters begin moving about. Throw in a beautiful harvest moon overhead and we should have a wonderful trip.”

Read more:RN-T.com - CRBI planning pair of local paddle events

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